COTUIT HALL TODAY

Cotuit Hall celebrates a longstanding history of being a home for students of all ages. Cotuit Hall has been at the heart of the Oxford’s education programmes for 100 years and was first used for teaching in 1916 by Headington School.

1890

Cotuit Hall was designed by H. W. Moore and built by Parnell & Sons of Rugby. The building was formerly known as Napier House, and it took its name from Arthur Sampson Napier (1853–1916),
Fellow of Merton College and Professor of English Language and Literature, who had it built and lived here with his large family from 1892 until his death 24 years later.

1916–1930

Cotuit Hall in Pullens Lane was the junior section of the Headington School.

1930s

Cotuit Hall was occupied by Redvers Opie, Fellow and Tutor in Economics at Magdalen College.

1940–1955

Cotuit Hall was the City of Oxford Children’s Home.

1950s

Cotuit Hall used as a private house again, occupied by the Revd D. B.Jones.

1962

Cotuit Hall was a Hostel of the College of Technology, which later became the Polytechnic and then Oxford Brookes University.

1966

Erection of a threestorey building to provide residential accommodation for students and singlestorey building for games/lecture room and ancillary accommodation approved. Cotuit Hall itself was occupied by the Oxford College of Garden Design.

2011

The entire Cotuit Hall site sold by Oxford Brookes University to EF Academy.

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    COTUIT HALL TODAY

  • Cotuit Hall is a boarding school for international students who are studying A-Levels or equivalent IB Diploma curriculums
  • There are currently five buildings on site which function predominantly as accommodation for between 220 and 308 students
  • The school is currently having to use teaching and kitchen facilities at the nearby International Language School
  • Previous proposals to improve the existing site and bring the school under one roof was submitted in 2012
  • The plans were later withdrawn in 2013 following feedback from stakeholders on the design and landscaping, all of which have been addressed in the current proposals which are significantly different